Questionable Motives

November 11, 2009

Why religious influence needs to be heavily criticized.

Filed under: Christianity,Criticism,Media,Medicine,Politics,Religion — tildeb @ 12:53 am

popeFrom CNN about the House health care bill: The sources blamed the potential postponement on GOP delaying tactics. Sharp differences among Democrats over abortion and immigration, however, have raised questions over whether Speaker Nancy Pelosi has the 218-vote majority needed for passage.

Now House leaders are not only negotiating with fellow lawmakers, but also with representatives from the bishops’ organization, Democratic sources said.

“It’s come to this,” said one bewildered senior Democratic lawmaker, speaking on condition of anonymity in order to discuss internal deliberations.

Anti-abortion Rep. Brad Ellsworth, D-Indiana, came up with compromise language that he said accomplished the goal of preventing taxpayer money from being used for abortions. Democratic leaders agreed to it, but the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops wrote a memo saying it leaves loopholes that could allow federal funds to go toward abortions.

Pelosi and fellow Democratic leaders are working behind closed doors, scrambling to forge a compromise.

If the catholic church and their misogynistic pedophilia-forgiving  sex-starved clerics in dresses are going to interfere in public policy within the secular liberal democracies of the world, it needs to justify why it as an organization has any right to do so. Those justifications need to be provided and undergo a vigorous public debate at a minimum to determine if such a voice has any merit. I welcome that debate.

For the RC church to participate in such public policy matters as the US health care bill, the first step must be for the secular state to remove all tax exemptions for that religious organization so that all lobby groups who attempt to influence that public policy are on equal taxable footing. Favouring religious institutions to have its cake and eat it too – to gain tax exemption from the secular domain of governance while participating and influencing the secular domain of governance – is a hypocritical, unfair, unethical, underhanded, and unjustified means to influence public policy.

Here we have yet another fine example of religious interference of, and influence peddling towards, public policy regarding the US health reform bill. They should pay for that privilege.

In the meantime, who gave the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops the right to peddle their anti-secular bigoted immoral tripe on all US citizens’ behalf… especially on matters of a woman’s reproductive rights? This is the same organization who lied – from the pope to the local pulpit – about the effectiveness of condoms to reduce the transmission of AIDS/HIV. This kind of medical ignorance kills.

Shame on any politician who kowtows to such liars and abusers and shame on any man or woman who continues to support the misogynistic RC church in matters of determining access to particular kinds of health care, just to align public policy with their ‘private’ beliefs. Private theistic beliefs are not relevant to political issues in providing medical care to the general public. Simply put, these religious beliefs do not belong in the current debate about health care reform.

Roll the bones if you must include hints from the occult to determine your own health care options, and perhaps sacrifice a chicken or two if you must introduce superstition into your own life over the same concerns, but keep your superstitious nonsense out of my face, out of the public domain altogether, or be prepared to be heavily criticized for promoting your sanctimonious nonsensical superstitious preferences in the public domain.

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