Questionable Motives

February 24, 2010

Anti-choice advocates: why is it all right to allow the female incubator to die?

Filed under: abortion — tildeb @ 5:59 pm

Read it and weep:

Amalia (an alias), a 27-year old Nicaraguan woman with a 10-year-old daughter, has been diagnosed with metastatic cancer. She is in the hospital and could be treated, but for one thing.

She is also pregnant.

And therefore, under the law in Nicaragua, her life is meaningless.

Amalia–a person, a woman, a daughter, a sister, a mother–may soon become one of those statistics we all bat around from the safety of our computers to talk about abortion and maternal death.

First diagnosed with cancer many years ago, Amalia was treated and went into remission.  She moved on and lived her life.  She had a daughter, now 10 years old, for whom she wants to stay alive.

In the first week of January, she was hospitalized and after testing was diagnosed with metastatic cancer for which her doctor stated aggressive chemotherapy and radiation would be needed to save her life.

However, because the chemotherapy might affect or lead to the death of the fetus, no doctor will treat her because they fear the consequences of a law that leads to imprisonment for doctors who even deign to think that women like Amalia–merely an incubator under Nicaraguan law–have the right to be treated as aggressively as they would a man.

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5 Comments »

  1. God’s will!

    Comment by 4amzgkids — February 28, 2010 @ 8:59 pm | Reply

  2. It’s that kind of answer that protects misogynists! Why can’t I vote? God’s will. Why can’t I become a priest? God’s will. Why am I worth half of what a man is worth? God’s will. Why can’t I have the same level of health care as a man? God’s will. The answer is absolute tripe.

    If you honestly believed that tripe, you would not seek any interference from god’s will: you would not seek ANY medical medications or treatments that actively and intentionally interfere with god’s will. And it takes a special kind of profound and disturbing arrogance to assume one has the right to make such a decision on behalf of another. But hey, that’s what religious belief promotes: a special and personal relationship with a sky father that grants permission to hold and put into practice such deep arrogance.

    Comment by tildeb — March 1, 2010 @ 5:02 pm | Reply

  3. WHat does medical care, etc… have to do with this? You really go off on some tangents! If God wills it, it’s done. If I am to die today in a car accident, then that is God’s will. We are to seek medical care, they do not teach us not to do that. BUT…say for example I have a paper cut and get staph, it is not cured and it can be, then that is God’s will. Get it?

    Comment by 4amzgkids — March 1, 2010 @ 11:50 pm | Reply

    • I get it: it’s all god’s will, all good, all the time, except, well, anything bad, of course, is also god’s will but polluted in some way by man’s choice to do bad, and natural disasters, well, they are also god’s will and good in some inscrutable way plus the rest of us can learn to make the right choice because everything happens for a reason and god has his reasons even if for the very life of us we can’t quite figure it out what they may be when accompanied by so much suffering.

      Nice gig… if you’re god.

      But the point you don’t get is: it is people who justify whatever they wish with the unprovable notion that ‘it’ – meaning whatever the religious leaders decide – is actually god’s will, so don’t argue with the religious leaders, because they’re just the messengers, and your job isn’t to question god’s will but to just accept what these religious leaders know is what god’s will happens to be.

      Which raises the important question: how do YOU know what god’s will actually is so that YOU can choose which religious leader has the pipeline to god’s will? And is that framework for knowing god’s will versus some misogynist’s will any better informed than anyone else? Again, how do you know?

      Comment by tildeb — March 2, 2010 @ 12:38 am | Reply

  4. Including the lack of evidence for god – that’s gods will too.

    Sports team wins game – thank Jesus.

    Sports team loses game – thank??

    Comment by misunderstoodranter — March 2, 2010 @ 6:27 am | Reply


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