Questionable Motives

January 25, 2012

When did Islam stop being a religion and become a race?

Filed under: Islam,Jesus and Mo — tildeb @ 12:12 pm

When it became handy to avoid legitimate criticism by calling those who dare do so ‘racists’!

 

Advertisements

February 25, 2011

What would life be like without god?

Filed under: Jesus and Mo — tildeb @ 10:01 am

 

(From Jesus and Mo)

January 5, 2011

Chris Mooney is at it again: isn’t ‘spirituality’ really another word for ‘religion’?

The piece (Chris Mooney’s article in Playboy) is about scientists who aren’t religious, but are spiritual, in an atheistic sort of way. An excerpt:

But can scientists who say they are awestruck by nature and moved by their research really relate to more traditional religious experiences, a la those reported by saints? Aren’t “awe” and “wonder” nondescript notions that add emotional embroidery to the brute facts of the universe? Perhaps not. Feelings of awe, wonder and mystery recur in the context of human quests for deeper understanding or revelation. In his 1917 work The Idea of the Holy, German theologian Rudolph Otto singled out a sense of awe as a key characteristic of our encounters with what he termed the “numinous”–an overwhelming power or presence beyond ourselves.

Science can unleash this feeling too. Just sit in a darkened room and look at nebulae pictures from the Hubble Space Telescope, as University of Rochester astrophysicist Adam Frank describes doing in his book The Constant Fire: Beyond the Science vs. Religion Debate. “Scientists are not the only ones who catch their collective breath before these pictures,” he writes. “The momentary hush and the gasp that follow are involuntary.”

Mooney is one of those authors (who is funded in part by being a Fellow the Templeton Foundation) to vainly search for ways to force science and religion to be compatible ways of knowing. He claims to be all about communication by bashing gnu atheists, making up stories about them, posting these lies on his blog at Discover, banning people who dare criticize him, and pretending that it is the atheists who inhibit this ‘natural’ fit. For years he complained about framing, that a failure to frame religion and its active interference in gaining and applying knowledge while promoting superstition and ignorance in their place was detrimental to promoting science. I hold Mooney and his ego in contempt.

Now he’s switched gears a bit and is on what I call the Spirituality Bandwagon: that religion is really a substitute word for what it should be… spirituality. Because what we call spirituality can be shared by both atheist and believer, Mooney wants to re-FRAME the natural incompatibility between faith-based beliefs and knowledge as one of a common spirituality expressed in these different but compatible ways. But are they?

From Jerry Coyne about what science and religion really offer each other:

1. Religion gains but one thing from science: an increasing knowledge about the universe that makes mockery of religious doctrine, forcing the faithful to revise their dogma while claiming that it was consistent with science all along.

2. Science has nothing to gain from religion, which is simply an annoyance that distracts us from our job.

This is an excellent post by Ken on the state of NOMA today with a bang-on cartoon by jesusandmo over at Open Parachute.

Meanwhile, back at Whyevolutionistrue, Coyne comments about Mooney’s article and gets to the heart of the matter:

What a smarmy and intellectually dishonest piece of accommodationist tripe, relying as it does on conflating two completely disparate notions of “spirituality”!  Can we agree, then, that when we get all emotional about a piece of music or a novel or a nebula, or experience wonder at the products of natural selection—that we give these emotions a name different from “sprituality”?  That just confuses the diverse meanings of the term (which was Mooney’s intent) and gives ammunition to acoommodationists.

PZ Myers joins in and is also bang on with his criticism of Mooney and his ilk:

Well, spirituality is all about the believers. It’s a slimy game relying on the fact that apologists love to dodge criticisms of religion, the body of concrete, specific, institutionalized beliefs about the supernatural, by retreating to the tactical vagueness of “faith” or “spirituality”, whatever the hell they are.

You can’t expect us to simply respect foolish ideas. We tolerate them, but people like Mooney go further and demand that we respect nonsense, and that’s not going to happen, and shouldn’t happen.

And trying to coopt an honest scientific appreciation of the wonders of the universe as support for religion is a dishonest attempt to prop up bogus superstitions with an appeal to emotions — any emotions. If a scientist isn’t a passionless robot, Mooney wants to be able to pretend they’re on the side of religious dogma. That rankles. Love of science is not equatable to clinging to ignorance, although Chris Mooney is straining to make it so.

October 25, 2010

What’s the Alternative?

Filed under: Atheism,belief,Jesus and Mo,Religion — tildeb @ 1:19 pm

Brilliant.

(from Jesus and Mo)

September 24, 2010

What’s the e-word?

Filed under: Jesus and Mo — tildeb @ 12:08 pm

(Thanks to jesusandmo.net)

For anyone curious where I’ve been this past week, I’ve been commenting a lot over at John Shore’s site. He is a good writer and hosts some terrific conversation, too. Come on over and have a peak.

September 9, 2010

Alas, what can we do?

Filed under: Jesus and Mo,theology — tildeb @ 2:04 pm

(jesusandmo.net)

August 28, 2010

What is the meaning of this?

Filed under: Jesus and Mo,theology — tildeb @ 9:00 am

(From JesusandMo.net)

July 20, 2010

What’s not compatible?

Filed under: Jesus and Mo,Religion,Science — tildeb @ 8:11 pm

June 8, 2010

Why are atheists morally bankrupt?

Filed under: Atheism,Jesus and Mo,Morality — tildeb @ 8:47 am

Thanks to Jesus and Mo

May 29, 2010

What’s Jesus and Mo’s take on NOMA?

Filed under: Jesus and Mo,NOMA — tildeb @ 4:43 pm

From Jesus and Mo

Next Page »

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.